Teach Your Parents Well: Communicating With Children Before Birth

The intense interest in the afterlife focuses on what happens once the physical body dies and whether it is possible to communicate with the dead. Mental health professionals are beginning to realize that after-death communication helps alleviate grief to a far greater extent than just counseling and/or bereavement support groups.

If we believe we can contact the dead, then it begs some questions. First: What exactly are we communicating with when we speak to the dead? We contend that what remains after the demise of the physical body is known variously as the soul or consciousness, and it comprises a unique form of energy that we define as the ability to love. English biologist and author Rupert Sheldrake writes about morphic fields that exist before the appearance of anything physical (including human beings). That makes a great deal of sense to us.

Soul-energy-consciousness is eternal precisely because it is an energy that not only survives the material physical body, but exists quite apart from any material reality, including earth. This raises yet another question. If soul-energy-consciousness survives the physical body’s death, can it not also exist before the physical body’s birth? Greek philosopher Plato argued for the existence of the soul before birth as well as its survival after the physical body’s demise.

We believe that our society’s entire definition and understanding of life is much too limited. We live not only after the physical body’s demise, but before it is born, too. And since we communicate with the deceased, we can also talk to the not yet born. Think of the potential of such pre-birth communication to transform the entire field of parenting and child psychology.

The many concerns of parents-to-be

From the moment a woman knows she is pregnant, even if she and her spouse or partner very much want to be parents, one or both may worry or feel some anxiety, especially if this is a first child.

They have all manner of questions about their parenting abilities and their pending offspring. Will I be a good parent? Who is this person to be? How will I know what to do or say?

One of the best ways to find answers is to ask the source, meaning the soul of the child to be born. Children do not come into this world with minds that are clean slates. This notion of the mind as tabula rasa was first articulated by 17th century English philosopher John Locke, one of the most influential Enlightenment thinkers. While modern biology’s focus on genetics has layered on the concept of inherited traits, the belief that kids’ minds are empty and just waiting to be molded still influences most education systems and parenting theories worldwide.

It’s also utterly mistaken. Every soul comes to a physical lifetime with its own levels of wisdom, knowledge, and issues. Before they are born into physical bodies, wiser souls reflect on why they want to spend a physical lifetime on earth (and no doubt other physical realities, too). They choose a purpose for the life that is general, such as expressing love, teaching, or healing, etc. The soul also choses some lessons to focus on, and a group of souls that remain on the other side as helpers, known as spirit guides or angels.

Granted, not all souls make the effort to go through this preparation, and just take the first physical body available. That often leads to a life that, in the words of another Enlightenment thinker, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, turns out to be solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short. It’s beyond the scope of this article to discuss why souls make such poor pre-birth choices, although they can ultimately lead to greater self-awareness.

No instruction manual

Let’s assume the souls have chosen a life purpose, lessons, and spirit guides. They still arrive on earth without an instruction manual or user guide, leaving their parents struggling to bring up a total stranger. They have no clue about their child’s life purpose or lessons, and they never consciously contact the youngster’s spirit guides (or their own) for help and perspective. Yes, today’s parents benefit from an ever-expanding plethora of books and blogs about raising a child (or more). Even so, this advice stems from research and theory that may or may not apply to their offspring, or from the experience of other parents with, once again, different children.

Small wonder parenting is much harder and scarier than it has to be. We are not taking advantage of our best resources. At the soul level, even children not born are perfectly capable of telling their parents about their life’s purpose and lesson(s), and even why they chose a particular set of parents. Knowing this critical information does several important things for both sides. It helps a child be more comfortable with her or his parents to be. Many souls wonder if they made the best choice, and many later regret their selection of parents and life situation or insist that they never asked to be born.

For the parents, pre-birth communication removes a lot of the guesswork out of raising a particular child. It also reminds them that although their child’s physical body may be younger than theirs, the child is spiritually their equal. Rather than owning their child or children, mothers and fathers come to the freeing and loving recognition that they are simply stewards of their youngsters’ upbringing. It also helps them understand that they are not solely responsible for problems their children face in mastering life lessons.

There are no studies yet of the differences that communicating with children before birth can make in the lives of both parents and the next generation. We hope soon that such research will be undertaken because we have witnessed the profoundly positive influence of such communication and want to encourage widespread adoption of the practice.

 

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